I made the Cover -Art

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Art by Max Currie, go check out his stuff!

Finally! This post! I mentioned a couple posts back I did a painting for a friend’s book. Well that book happens to be a graphic novel my artist friend Max Currie premiered at Heroes Convention in NC. He and his co-creator Tony Zollo were set up in the Illustrious Indie Island section of the con selling copies of their newly pressed 120+ paged book.

Flag Hunter Volume 1 - with title - watermarked

I am super honored that Max wanted my art for the cover, I have always been a big fan of his work and I really love the story line in “Flag Hunter”. It was a bit of a trial working on it but I really like how it turned out. I’m really not exaggerating about it being a trial: I left myself 24 hours to get it done and fought with my materials every step of the way.

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Notice the pink coffee mug dangerously close to the art supplies. It did get a paint brush dipped in it.

To start my process I do some rough thumbnails to figure out what image I want to go with then I gather reference images. Jared was very accommodating for the whole process.

I enjoy playing with different levels of opacity in my art and revealing different stages of my process underneath. Normally I do this by doing an under-painting in bright accent colors, and selectively add paint on top with an opaque color in oil paint. With the time crunch I put myself in oil paint dry time was out of the question. 🙃

Resigned to using acrylics, I sketched out my image and traced it onto my final substrate, a leftover piece of watercolor paper. Or so I thought. 🙃🙃 There is a reason for shelling out $$$ for watercolor paper, because its fibers have a special sizing that absorbs liquid in a beautiful and feathery way. The paper I had just traced my sketch and partially inked an under-drawing onto was not absorbing water or color in a beautiful or feathery way. Queue some internal and external screaming. **pro tip lesson learned: label scraps of art paper with some artist tape so you always know what you’re using**

I didn’t have any other watercolor paper that was both large enough and smooth enough to work on. I needed something at least 12×18 for the scanner and with a smoother surface so it would play nice with pen tips. I decided to use a piece of paper from an Arches coldpress (textured)  block I had. Luckily after tearing the sheet out I discovered the back of it was much less rough so I ended up using that. Crisis averted, and I was able to lay in a beautiful ink wash with my Liquitex inks.

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Just the loveliest.

Next up to give me sh*t was my acrylics 🙃🙃💀. I’m mostly an oil and watercolor painter, using acrylic only to do large washes in under-paintings. I haven’t invested in quality acrylics so the majority of my collection is hand me downs or leftover samplers from employee art competitions from my days working in an art store. -Btws those competitions were always with pretty terrible student grade paint- Suffice to say the struggle was unreal. Between terrible thin texture and exceedingly quick dry times I had a few moments where I wondered if it would even come together.

It did though! And I will definitely get a quality set of acrylics before ever working with them again. I was impressed with the few decent tubes of paint I had. There were a few tubes of Liquitex that belonged to my late grandmother that have to be nearly 30 years old by now and were easily the best paints of my collection. Their feel and texture held up and were a small ray of hope in my caffeine paint fueled haze.

My Tombow Markers were the saving grace of this painting. They had bright punchy colors and actually worked on top of the acrylics as well as under it. It was my first time experimenting with this technique and it’s definitely something I will try again.

So with a little caffeine, a little ingenuity, and healthy amount of panic I finished the painting just in time to scan it in and send it to Max. I learned a lot of helpful things while working on it and honestly I did enjoy the process despite my emphasis on the frustrating parts. Now with that accomplishment I am feeling more confident in attacking new projects, be on the look out for more to come! 

Best laid plans.

Excuse my French, but ding dang darn doodly, this past week has been crazy: we drove home from our trip to the mountains, painted and decorated a room in senior living facility, and I made a painting for my friend’s book cover.

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4.5 days later we have a whole new space

So let me backup a little and explain.

BEIGE

BEIGE

Recently, my mother asked for help with furnishing a space for her adoptive aunt, who was to be moved into an elderly living facility. Recently as in three months ago – there have been some technical difficulties. Things finally started moving and Jared and I got the green light to work on the room, which happened to be the day before the trip we had planned for our anniversary. We had already done so much prep work in the previous months – designing layout, gathering furniture and decor items, picking out paint colors – that we figured the 5 days we had to work in the room should be plenty of time to get it all together before my great Aunt moved in.

so much beige!

Beige nightmare

Spoilers: we were still decorating when she arrived. This worked out though, as she seemed enjoy all the bustle happening around her.

Like most of my carefully detailed and thought-through plans, I may have been a smidge bit over ambitious with this project. I had a master list so what could possibly go wrong?

hustle! hustle! hustle!

The studio *was* clean

Well, while chatting with my friend I remembered promising him a piece of art for a book he would be selling at a convention and, as it turns out, his deadline for getting his book to the printers was quickly approaching, so there went 24 hours. Also, it took the better part of five days to finish painting the room after I had planned on it taking maybe 7-8 hours tops. My project list quickly became less manageable:

  • Paint the room and the bathroom
  • Upgrade a simple Ikea night stand with paint and stain
  • Upgrade Ikea bed frame with wood stain and build a padded headboard
  • Paint couch sourced from goodwill to bring it from an intense floral to a soft neutral
  • Sew some pillows for the couch in matching fabric from the headboard
  • Create a backdrop focal point over the bed
  • Make some decorative art for the room
  • Arrange a gallery wall of art and objects from her home
  • Upcycle a large wall clock with clearer numerals
  • Sew curtain valances and an under sink curtain
  • Install easy lift, light filtering shades for the windows
  • Plants for the windowsills
  • Add lights to closets and kitchenette
  • Put all lamps on a remote power switch
  • Build a simple desk/table
  • Anything else I can think of

The highlighted bits describe the timeline:

Green is a task we handled before we even got into the room,

Blue is a task we worked on in the room before my aunt arrived,

Red is something we did day of or after she got there, and

un-highlighted things we have yet to do.

Strike through portions are things that I decided to pass on / weren’t going to work out.

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ahhhhhhhh.

Despite the chaos, what came together is quite lovely. My Aunt is an incredibly sweet and feisty lady with a unique personal style I have always admired. She spent a large part of her life working in Africa and I am so glad I was able to  incorporate her aesthetic and items into the room. With my mom benefacting the venture (within a reasonable budget), I was able to gather and thrift the rest of the furniture items and work on them to fit my Aunt’s style. Even though I didn’t get everything done that I wanted, the space we created for her was exactly what it needed to be: a breath of fresh air and a cozy place for her and memorable items from her home.

I really enjoyed the process of designing, even with the bits of chaos in between. I am incredibly proud of what was accomplished and my aunt seemed to enjoy her new space as well. I have several diy project tutorials to share now as well, so stay tuned!

Along with leaving no fibers behind, Wooster roller brushes make excellent pillows.

How tired am I? 10. Ten tireds.